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Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> they are being called superstorms. fueled by changing climate, higher temperatures, and rising sea levels. >> climate change is real. it's here. it's going to happen again. >> people and cities once safe. now in the eye of the fury. >> i see the weather changing. absolutely. >> is this the era of the superstorm? >> water level is rising substantially. >> and are we ready? >> if this wall had been here -- >> for the next one? >> i've been telling everybody, the big flood is coming. we better start building the ark. >> living near the ocean, there's always that chance that the ocean is going to come take away everything that you've got. but never did i imagine that this was going to happen to me and my family and my community. >> even now, given all that has happened to him and his family, it is still hard for nick camerada to understand it al
knowledge but for them they live in a very insular environment and that insular environment is one that dictates to make a living and put food in their mouth and just what they're doing and kind of the problem that we have here. there's a demand in the united states for the drugs and there's a demand over there for them to survive and so that's the big picture. >> well, you know, we mentioned drugs and weapons. but what about exotic animals? how big is that industry and how can toure get a dragon? >> i can't help him facilitate anything illegal. >> come on. >> talk to him after the show. >> yeah right. okay. i mean, the thing is, i didn't realize how big the illegal animal trade is but the crime syndicates just as big if not bigger than the biggest drug syndicates in the world and all over in southeast asia and things do trickle back to here but talking about the animal trade, it is really a cultural thing. china's one of the main consumers of these products and what happens is like i went to cambodia, laos, thailand, all these places. these people are raised culturally to eat some
national debt? with economic growth at best, 3.6%, how will markets behave in that environment? >> i think, overall, the equity markets are looking at substantially lower growth and higher deficits. these negotiations need to work out to be reasonably positive for the financial markets. these projections are really subject to massive change depending on the negotiations. overall, equity investors are basically hunker down for a long period of very slow growth. to, 2.5%. lori: how do you expect markets to react as we go to this budget negotiation? >> equity markets are anticipatory by nature. basically, the report in early december was to ignore these negotiations in washington. i do not think you will see devastating news come out of this process. hopefully we will see something more positive and get on a more sustainable path on the deficit front. in all likelihood, you are not likely to see big changes. lori: what is the best way to be investing around the dow here? >> i do believe that, basically, use pullbacks as a buying opportunity. yesterday was a bit of a reality check for investor
as we go through the rest of the year. i mean, we're still in the slow growth environment. we're still deleveraging. we're still dealing with fiscal austerity. i don't think the markets are fully taking that into account right now and investors have to be aware of that. >> so what exactly are you -- would you be telling clients right here? let's say they have been, like a lot of people, heavily into these irisk off bond portfolios. would you keep them there? >> we've been saying the same thing for quite some time right now. the environment we've been in is not one for somebody that's hunkered down, defensive, holding cash in treasuries. you're almost guaranteed to underperforming inflation investing in those things over the last five to ten years. even the shorter term period, you may see bigger puts. equities have a lot of risk to them. what we've been doing is positioning people in the middle of the risk sector. that means lower risk, stable, dividend paying equities, taking risk in your fixed income with high yield bank loans and using unique investment options like secured options
for joining us. what do you think. should it be contraband and illegal or are we saving the environment or being intrusive. >> now, this is one of those times i laugh at the mayor, i never trust a guy, that spends millions of his own dollars to win election he can't win on his own without spending all those millions. he then comes out and says what type of drink you can buy and how big it is going to be. now, he sits there and flat out bored or what, on the list of things they are facing new yorkers, education, taxes, the winter storm, he is sitting they're going, i really don't like styrofoam. i don't know how far this guy is going to go. yeah, it's overbearing. i would tell him, instead of sitting up in your office, go down the street vendors and how complicated this could make their life. i don't think he has done that or any intention to. >> heather: you have the ban on big gulps and now styrofoam, what do you think? >> this is based on the demur. this is based on those who manufacturer and use this in the food business and the fact is, the epa has 57 chemicals that has caused disea
, they will cripple our ability to grow our economy and provide an environment where all americans have the opportunity to lead healthy, safe and productive lives. that is what really brings us together here today because sequestration is about more than numbers on a ledger. there are real people behind these numbers and their lives and livelihoods are on the line. these cuts have consequences and every american will pay the price. with fewer food inspectors we will be more susceptible to foodborne illness. we will be at greater risk of deadly disease outbreak as public health laboratories close. with fewer air traffic controllers flights will be curtailed. classroom size will increase as teachers are laid off. national parks will close up. we will be less safe with fewer police on the streets and we will wait longer to cure debilitating diseases like cancer and alzheimer's. today ndd united is sending two members of congress and the white house a 72 page letter signed by 3200 national, state and local organizations including those represented here today to stop the political brinksmans
. the condo market in the major environments is on fire. melissa: really? dottie, do you agree with that? yeah, real estate is back, buy, buy, buy. i heard that before. tell me in a convincing way. >> no, it's back. in fact, new york a year and a half ago, but back across the country, and there's also a shortage of inventory. you have to buy it and buy it quick. melissa: that's a good sales pitch. madison, in l.a., things flying off the lot there, i was going to say "shelf," but there's not the shelf. >> flying off the cove, yes. they are flying, and the market has taken off exciting, this year, so far, we had a big sale of $75 million in malibu with a foreign buyer. it's taking off to a good start. melissa: ridiculous. jeff, let me ask you, when i look at the lot of the markets that are on fire right now, it really concerns me because it looks like all the same problems that we saw last time around, for example, one of the markets you think is going to do the best is phoenix. i know zillow projectses prices in phoenix could be up 8.5% next year. that makes me nervous. >> the reality is that t
and the environment in southern afghanistan and western pakistan. , and it born as an attempt at new america by a diverse group of researchers to get at some of the diversity of the taliban itself at the time when the united states was puzzling over the rejury gent as a movement and a political force in afghanistan. as a military challenge, and really a challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 defeat of the islamic member of the afghanistan. and which revived and presented itself as a grave d.a. lem that toment obama administration as it arrived in 2009. our effort to cowhat think tanks do. provide ground for it an complexity and granularity about this phenomena. recognizing that the sort of clicheed image of one eyed -- and his band of the devoted and attractable fan net tack was inadequate and falsifying of the problem. so the purpose was not prosecute a particular view of the taliban but just to start to document some sections of the diversity. and some aspect of the characteristic that were otherwise not part of american debate and discourse. i'm really proud of this
here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> let me finish tonight with this. the debate over whether to use deadly force against an american who is on foreign soil and tied to al qaeda. that sounds like a hypothetical straight out of my constitutional law class in my first year of law school. i can just picture us going back and forth over whether killing an american in these circumstances violated the fourth amendment's protection against unlawful seizure or the fifth amendment's due process clause. but this is no academic exercise. this is hardball on a world stage. and the safety of americans is at stake. i read the 16-page undated and unsigned justice department white paper with great interest, especially where it said that "targeting a member of an enemy force who poses an imminent threat of violent attack to the united states is not unlawful, it is a lawful act of
. >> but they've created this environment for this to happen. what do you mean? that's a risk decision that companies are making for some reason they've decided they need to operate with massive and huge cash balances, okay? and for whatever reason, there have been an absence of investors like iron horn who said, give me back the cash. find a way to redistribute it. i don't know, bob, in terms of macroeconomic development -- >> i think some of the corporate cash comes from firms that have made money and they don't feel like taking risk in this environment. apple is the technology company and i can understand apple's view that they have freedom of cash on the balance sheet. some of this is complicated. some of the cash is overseas, they bring it home, thee incur some tax liability. cash on your balance sheet is freedom. it's freedom from bankers. >> we're going to slip in a quick break. bob, you're going to be with us for the rest of the hour. and i'm going to send it back to pebble beach and the one and only becky quick. >> when we come back, we're talking about putting money to work b
' money other than stocks because of the low rate environment. andrew, how are you investing right now? >> well, we're probably going to go ahead and move in this market. looks like the pullback is more likely 1650 back to these levels. so more than likely now is probably the time to ease into the market. you've got tremendous momentum and breath here. you're fighting the tape, as they say. this is probably the time to deploy. >> meanwhile, rick santelli, the race to the bottom of the currency markets was interrupted today. horror of horrors. japanese officials saying they don't want the currency to go much lower. and the euro moving higher as well today. >> once you put that machine in motion, i don't know if you can stop it. and bill, i find it so telling you have so much more outrage about a maker's mark liquidity injection than the fed's liquidity injections. >> what's your point? >> that's a story for another day. because that's not good for either. a 20-year chart of the dollar index looks like it's going to be going at these levels for awhile. they look like they're going to sta
is the cost for that financial crisis solution which is austerity meaning very lackluster economic environment unlikely to see any acceleration there. so look forward is where we see the weaker picture, again not the end of a bull market. i think that that would be only the case if maybe pes were around 17 or 18 where they usually are. still have room ahead. >> let me jump up. let me jump in because we have a less than 30 seconds. you heard suzanne's package, individual investors feel like i have to get into this market because i don't want to miss out. quickly what are you telling your investors what they should do and still be safe about it, real quickly. >> there were good opportunities to buy on the pullback, we don't see a bear market. you want to look to buy industrial stocks from the manufacturing recovery, home builders from that long-term uptick in housing activity, those are good places to add as the market pulls back. >> we'll see how it plays out, thanks. jeff kleintop, chief market strategist at lpl financial. >> tom: stocks weren't the only market seeing some selling pressure. si
, you know the environment was electrifying, it was cold, but it didn't matter with 200,000 of your closest friends. >> how is that weather going to transition to wednesday, thursday and possibly the weekend? here's lynette with the details. >> we are dry. maryland's most powerful radar is scanning the skies with all the sweeps on. not a whole lot to scan this morning and that's going to continue right through today. we won't have a change in the forecast until we head into friday, talking about some more wet weather on tap. but for right now temperatures are above average, coming in at 32 degrees in colombia. yes, we're cold, make sure you bundle up as you head out and about. 33 in davidsonville right now and elkton coming if at 28. the winds are calm, on the light side right now but they will pick up from the northwest at about five to 15 miles an hour. another story of the day, a big one, we
, seemed like a normal environment. >> you talk about obviously newtown, aurora, we don't have a template. we don't know whose going to behave this way. >> let me read you something, these are his words, allegedly his own words, a manifesto. i understand you don't know whose at a keyboard when you read something online. i know most of you who personally know me are in disbelief to hear from media reports that i'm suspected of committing such horrendous murders and have taken drastic and shocking actions in the last couple of days. unfortunately, this is a necessary evil that i do not enjoy, but must partake and complete for a substantial change to occur within the lapd and reclaim my name. joey jackson is that a confession, if they take him in alive, will most certainly come out in court and lead to potentially a death penalty conviction? >> absolutely, ashleigh. this is something that he is saying that he has to do. he has to satisfy whatever vendetta he has against action taken against him. so certainly those are admissions, those will freely be used against him in court. the reason of
of this working environment. they had several different workstations where they could see the trains coming in and out of the station and further up the line. completely destroyed. need to be replaced and rebuilt. >> the force of the water so great, it even destroyed escalators designed to last 40 years. >> the actual force of the water coming down the escalator lifted the landing plates from position. the pit itself still has several feet of water standing in it. these are one of our escalators that's a total loss. >> so this is going to have to come out altogether? >> come out and be replaced. >> the destruction here is just a part, a big part, but just a part of the pounding that the infrastructure system took as a result of superstorm sandy. just imagine, if you will, what happened to the electrical grid on the eastern seaboard. >> the northeast, obviously, took a real beating as a result of superstorm sandy. and i think it did reveal a number of weaknesses. among them, questions have come up fairly, i think, whether the utilities really did a good job overall. >> clark gellings knows m
to texas. last week in a radio ad governor perry said texas offers a friendlier business environment than california. >>> 7:48. tomorrow night, president obama will deliver his first state of the union address of his second term. jamie dupree joins us via skype. what are you hearing about the focus of the president's state of the union address? >> reporter: the basic line out of officials from the white house the last couple of days has been that the president will focus on economic issues, job and the economy, still at the top of the list. but, of course, i would think, tori, that he will talk about a number of very detailed items like the ideas of gun and gun violence in the wake of the newtown, connecticut shootings, immigration reform issues and the budget cuts coming up on march -- march 1,the focus -- the -- march 1st. the focus the white house is saying the argument will be on economic issues. we'll see what happens tomorrow night. >> do you expect he will set a more conciliatory tone with republicans or will he still have that aggression tone at the inauguration address? >> report
perry says texas offers a friendlier business environment than california. >>> president obama will deliver his state of the union address. white house says the main theme will be so-called pocketbook issues. policies to help the middle class. last week the president gave house democrats a preview of what he will say. >> i'm going to be talking about making sure that we are focused on job creation in the united states of america. >> the white house says after the state of the union address, president obama will travel to three different communities explaning the proposals in his speech. the president will go to ashville, north carolina on wednesday. atlanta, georgia on thursday. and chicago on friday. >>> tracy police are asking for the public's help to find the driver involved in a fatal hit and run. a bicyclist was hit and killed in a crash last wednesday on shulty road. police are looking for a dark can alreadied late '90s model sedan. anyone with information on the drivers identity or car is asked to contact tracy police. >>> time now 5:47. gun owners stocked up on ammo at
is disingenuous. i think in this environment you could have scrounged up the $2 billion. >> they needed the $2 billion. >> right. >> the idea that they somehow didn't -- they needed it from somewhere. >> exactly right. i think that's true. i also believe from dell's perspective you want microsoft in the mix there somehow. however you structure it for microsoft's purposes, it does help to have that, you know, calling card that says at least where we're not going to be left to drift -- >> they need to finance other -- other computer makers. yes -- >> does h.p. call up and say you know what, i need catch, rather than going to bank, we want you to give us a better rate. >> microsoft is in the hardware business, too, right, with the software -- the surface thing? >> surface and things like this. >> about xbox -- >> i don't know where this is going. >> if you look at it from a different point of view, this is the result of ben bernanke's easy monetary policy. because you've created an opportunity for people to releverage. this is part of a broad theme of cheap releveraging. because enjoy the are so
to be overweight in this environment. >> russ, the great andy surer from "fortune" magazine is here. >> hey, andy. a lot of people are felg like they've missed the rally in stocks, but you don't want to staying in bonds. they're caught between a rock and a hard place. unintended with you guys, i guess. sorry about that. what's your advice to them? >> there's a couple of things. when i think about this, i want to do it for my portfolio construction base. it's not stocks or bonds. people are going to earn both in their portfolio. right now, we would be overweighting stocks with their valuations. the key is to look for those areas where you're getting real or after inflation returns while minimizing the risks. that suggests taking down your treasury allocation significantly. looking at credit, looking at structured bank loans, looking at municipals that have been in high yields. not because these areas look particularly cheap, but on a relative basis, they offer much better yield with less risk in my opinion. >> okay. russ, we're going to leave tlit. we appreciate your perspective. we're going to he
're in an environment in which we have an all-volunteer force. we need to do a better job at assessing time. we don't take just anybody. >> well, chris kyle was known as the most lethal sniper in american military history. he was shown among his comrades for reaching out to them. the suspect is thought to be one of the very people chris kyle was helping. isn't this a call in and of itself for additional government assistance in terms of the condition of these people? because as we know, it's very hard to ascertain on occasions whether someone is suffering with ptsd. >> that's part of the problem. as you know, we've spoken before, there used to be a tremendous stigma about identifying yourself -- >> self-identifying. >> and we're quite a bit better now and the chain of command is very much involved in identifying people while they're on active duty as having problems. but when troops leave the service, that's when it's important that the service makes sure that the veterans administration knows that there are people who may have problems. i'm not certain that the service is doing the best job they c
, immigration, the environment, everything basically, but his lead on foreign policy is a staggering 14 points. what makes republicans think this is a good thing to have a fight over? >> right. up until recently everybody said, look, politics stops at the water's edge, and that hasn't been the case for the last couple years with this republican party. but it turns out that it wasn't necessarily that both parties followed that axiom because they were being nice about it. it turns out that it's incredibly bad politics to challenge your sitting president overseas. and, you know, this benghazi thing has not worked out for the republican party at all. they tried effectively to make it the biggest issue of the presidential campaign in the last several weeks, and people just didn't buy into it. what they saw is a tragedy. something that was -- if it could have been prevented, it should have been prevented, but they weren't going to start pointing blame and ask for the resignations of hillary clinton and throw barack obama out of office. >> right. >> and the idea that you'd be able to stop future cia
costs, education, the environment. you can go on and on. was more talk about electrified fences and self-deportation then there was about zero or mobility and modernizing our institutions. that's a problem. how do you do with this? you deal with it substantively, that is you put forth proposals that the public believes will address some of these problems. then there's the tonal issue, which is you have to sand off the rough edges and stop being the stupid party, as bobby jindal says. people speaking in a very rough manner about issues like rape, for example which hurt. sent a signal to voters that we really are not trying to have you. i'm proud of what eric cantor is doing. marco rubio and paul ryan are doing the same. host: peter wehner is joining us in this conversation about the future of the republican party. the numbers on the screen. you can send us the a tweet or e-mail. if that strategy is right, what does it say for those who describe themselves as republicans and others who describe themselves as the party conservatives? >> tea party is a force for good and there were hugely im
's a choppy, challenging environment out there. even for quick service. quick service does happen to hang in there a little better than the higher priced categories like full-service casual dining, for example. >> andy, thanks a lot. >> thank you. >> talking mcdonald's over at jefferys. >> in the northeast, the winter storm nemo, which is bowling towards us. jackie dean gel lis has the latest states on the storm. >> good morning, simon. let me just give you an update outside here first. the snow started coming down around 7:00 a.m. three hours later, we've got a wintry mix on our hands. but things actually aren't so bad. people commuting to and from work at this point. also checking out some of the other travel statistics out there. according to flight aware.com, about 4,125 flights have been suspended between yesterday, today, and also tomorrow, in preparation for winter storm nemo. which at this point is looking to potentially give us two feet of snow on parts of the northeast. and also, 12 inches of snow in new york city, where we are under a blizzard warning. meantime, amtrak is also
down, more regulation, more taxes, more of an not ti business kind of environment. the unemployment rate in texas is 7%. we're over 10%. surely they must realize that the policies here are incredibly negative. they're just anti-growth." how do you answer something like that? >> we're using that resmed case study in san diego to focus on just exactly what we might do, say, as a city or as a state to keep a company like that here. we hear a lot of generalities. i want to know the specifics. we're going to use that as a case study, and we take it seriously. we're not going to sacrifice in california or san diego a high quality of life based on educational investment, innovative economy, lifestyle, for, again, a short-term corporate profits. there are some companies, especially if they're low wage companies or established technologies that might profit from that and make that move, but when you're talking about our future and what we in san diego especially are doing is trying to recover from our economy with innovative based technologies and companies, that kind of allure is just not -
. anyone can do this to help the environment. narrator: in spring, good gardeners can't wait to get things growing. (chattering) need any more help? uh-uh. okay, i have to go help professor wiseman design a new terrarium. bye, george! george had his seed system set. first, he dug a hole. then he planted some seeds. ah! then he covered the hole. uh-huh. compass had a seed system, too. but he didn't plant seeds. he ate them. he thought it was awfully nice of george to put out a pigeon buffet. (pigeon cooing) aah! (cooing) (chatters angrily) (cooing) (hooting) compass thought this restaurant had weird rules. oh. (chattering) (cooing) maybe they weren't supposed to eat the seeds until george was finished. (george chatters happily; pigeons coo) huh? hey! (chatters, hoots) (hooting) or maybe you weren't supposed to eat while george was around. (hooting) (puzzled coo) (pigeons cooing) (cooing, wings flapping) huh? (pecking) (gasps) (yells) ooh... (hooting angrily) (chatters "uh-uh!") oh. (hooting) huh. huh? (yelling) (panting) george wished there were two of him. and then he remembered. farmer re
, right? >> yeah. so this is actually based on our 50-state report card look at the policy environment of all of our states. basically it shows what we already know. we know ha this country is 14, 17 and 25th in the globe in leading science and math. >> steve: spend about the most money, don't we? >> we absolutely -- >> steve: we should be number one for the number within cash. >> we shouldly should and yet we're not getting the return on investment that we need for our kids. so what we have to do and what we're trying to do through students first is really change those laws and policies. >> steve: one of the things you say is we need highly effective teachers. they've got plenty of knowledge, but i would imagine once you sit down in the classroom, you got to know how to get it out of your head and into theirs. >> that's right. the research is very clear that the most important factor in school that impacts student achievement letter is the quality of the teacher in front of the students every day. so we have to make sure that every single child is in the classroom with a highly effect
related to the earnings. in today's environment, there's a tremendous demand for high-quality, cash flow incomes for individuals, for institutions, for pensions, for insurance companies. so we think that if they distributed preferred stock with say a 4% yield there would be enormous demand. share holders that want that stable income could keep it and shareholders that want to own apple for the upside within the operations would continue to simply own the common and they would get a -- be able to take a lot of money off the table by selling the preferred to institutions that want it. >> you are long apple, right? is this all you think they need to do to get this stock moving again. this is a stock that has had quite a fall since its peak back in september? >> very simply put, we think for every 50 billion of prefer they had issue, it would unlock about $32 a share in apple. if apple used about half of their earnings toward this program, we think they would be able to issue approximately $500 billion, which would unlock about $320 per share and that assumes that the pe multiple doesn't exp
out that january, someone back in the retail environment all my life, january, the one month that i don't care about. i care about the other 11. anyway, head to the bond pits, rick san telly, the cme group r. >> yesterday talk about the ten-year note yield, the past year and a half, closing base circumstance in the six basis point range, from 195 basically to 201. really, that hasn't changed, the two-day chart of tens shows you we briefly did trade under 195, use that as the pivot, remember, closed at 176 the end of last year, basically up now 19 to 20 basis points the. might sound like a lot. anybody who traded bonds in a bygone day, know that used to be half a day's range. boone's, 160 as their pivot, very similar pattern. let's switch gears bit. we know the euro a 14-month high against the green back and closer to a three-year high against the yen. doesn't seem like mario draghi's single pillar central bank or not is please about the recent strength. think exports here. his comments? look what they did the euro versus the dollar this chart, look at the euro versus the yen. how di
in syria is it makes the operational environment much easier for al-qaeda and its allies. they can operate in cairo. they can have public demonstrations in cairo with mubarak gone and it doesn't hurt them. they don't get arrested or chased out of the country. so the changing middle east has played to the strengths of al-qaeda and certainly in terms of the pressure on them, except for pakistan, the pressure is off. >> brian: when you mentioned on the radio show to me that you're worried about your grandchildren and the world in which we are right now, we're cutting back and almost saying the enemy doesn't exist. >> well, it's not almost, brian. people like john brennan and the president, who have gone out of their way to say that jihad is like a rotary club for the world. they're just self-improving muslims. they've gone out of the way to make americans believe the danger and the threat in the world is reduced. and the combination of that lie with the cuts in the defense budget are certainly not good news for american security. >> brian: john brennan, we just saw video of him. he's poised t
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)